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AROS Application Development Manual -- The AROS Build System

Index

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This guide has its last major revision begin November 2006. Changes to the build system after this date will not be reflected in this guide.

Introduction

Purpose of the AROS build system

One may wonder why AROS needs a build system. The answer is that it simplifies the building of more complex binaries and takes away a lot of the manual work otherwise needed to compile, link and copy the files. Additionally this system builds a dependency tree over a big source code tree and will build the binaries in the right order so that all dependencies are fulfilled when a certain binary is built. The build system also makes the source code tree modular: you can add or remove certain directories and the build system will adapt to these changes. (Of course, one always has to take care not to delete code other parts still depend upon).

Components of the build system

AROS uses several development tools in its build system. A short list of the most important components is:

  • GNU make: the GNU version of the make program. The task of this program is to regenerate an output file from its dependencies using a user-defined program, like a compiler, a text processor, etc. The main advantage over a normal list of commands is that it will check if anything has changed in the source files and save time by not redoing the command if it's not necessary.

    Familiarity with GNU make and it's input file syntax is not strictly necessary where a developer's need is covered by the high level macros discussed later in this paragraph. Where this is not the case, one can use GNU's makefile syntax directly. The usage of the GNU make program won't be discussed in these pages but the GNU info pages about the make program are a good source of documentation.

  • MetaMake: A make supervisor program. It can keep an overview of all makefiles which exist in subdirectories of a certain root directory. A more in-depth explanation is given below.

  • genmf: (generate makefile) A macro language for makefiles. It simplifies the writing of the makefiles by providing high level macros for easy building of binary files for AROS.

  • Several other tools will be used by the build instructions. These contain AROS- and non-AROS-specific tools. More explanation of these tools will be given when appropriate.

To illustrate how these tools interact which each other we will explain what happens under the hood when you compile the HelloWorld program given in the previous chapter.

If you followed the tutorial for building the program with the build system you first added the local/helloworld directory with some source files; afterwards you called make local/helloworld in the top make directory. During the execution of this command the following steps were taken:

  • The make program calls the MetaMake program with the following command mmake AROS.local-helloworld. This instructs the MetaMake program to build the local-helloworld meta-target of the AROS project. If you build from the regular AROS source tree, AROS is the one and only project known to MetaMake.
  • The first thing MetaMake does when it is started, is to go over the source tree to see if there are directories added or deleted.
  • During the scanning of the directory tree MetaMake will also see if there are mmakefiles to be (re)generated. The program allows to generate a mmakefile from a mmakefile.src file. This feature is used by AROS to implement high level macros. In the helloworld example the %build_prog macro was used. If you have followed the helloworld example you can have a look at the resulting build instructions in local/helloworld/mmakefile. MetaMake also detects whether a mmakefile.src is newer then the existing mmakefile and will regenerate it.
  • A last thing MetaMake does when scanning the source tree is collect the MetaMake targets from all available mmakefile files and the dependency between the MetaMake targets. In the helloworld example the meta-target was defined as local-helloworld, by passing the argument mmake=local-helloworld to the %build_prog macro. If you look in the mmakefile you can see several lines starting with #MM; these are the lines defining the meta-targets and the dependency between them. It is not necessary to understand the exact meaning of these statements to be able to use the high level build macros provided by AROS.
  • When MetaMake has gone through the source tree and collected all the information about the meta-targets it will (try to) build the specified meta-target. In the previous step the program has built a dependency tree of the meta-targets. Before building the specified meta-target it will first build the meta-targets it depends on. In our example there are no dependencies and it will directly build the program from local/helloworld by calling the GNU make program in that directory.

Build system tutorial

In this section a description is given of the most important macros for AROS application development. The purpose is not to give an in-depth discussion but enough information to be able to perform most of the application development needs. An in-depth discussion of the build tools is given in the reference section in this manual.

Basic file syntax and set-up

As was seen in the helloworld example above you use the build system by putting a mmakefile.src file in the directory containing your source files. For the AROS build system to notice your file the directory containing it has to be within the AROS main source directory (the name of this top directory is most likely AROS). So for the moment you need to get hold of the AROS source code to be able to use the build system which is discussed in another chapter. A good place to put your own source code is in the AROS/local directory, as was done for the helloworld example.

An AROS mmakefile has to start with the following line:

include $(TOP)/config/make.cfg

...

The start line will set the environment in the makefile for AROS compilation. It has to be included because this environment is used by the MetaMake macros.

After this first line, most of the time one or more calls to a genmf macro will follow. Such a macro has the following syntax:

%macro param1=... param2=... ...

When the mmakefile.src file is translated into a mmakefile file the line above will be replaced with make commands defined by the macro. A macro is called by it's name followed by zero or more parameters with an optional value assigned to the parameter. The order of the parameters is not important and not all parameters defined by a macro have to get values; a default value will be used when a parameter is not provided. Some parameters may be mandatory and an error message will be generated when it is left out.

One macro call can be spread over several lines by ending a line with a backslash and continue the macro on the next line. So the example macro call could have been written also as:

%macro \
    param1=... \
    param2=... \
    ...

Normally no spaces are allowed in the values given to a parameter, if that is needed one has to enclose the list by double quotes (").

The following chapters will discuss the more important high level commands. Only the most important parameters for the macros will be treated there; a list and description of all parameters of a macro will be given in the reference section.

Building an AROS program

You can build a program by using the following macro in your mmakefile.src file:

%build_prog mmake=MetaTarget progname=Prog files=SourceFiles

This will build a program named Prog from the list of SourceFiles. By giving the mmake argument the MetaMake program will see that this program can be built by MetaTarget; e.g. doing make MetaTarget in the top AROS source directory will build the program. When typing this command also the dependencies will be built every time you want to recompile this module. Additionally a MetaTarget-quick meta-target will be defined that allows to build the program without the dependencies being rebuilt. This can save time when you are changing the source code of a program and want to rebuild it often.

The list of files SourceFiles are the name of the C input files without the .c suffix. As explained above this list has to be enclosed by double quotes if it contains more than one file.

By default, the program will have the same file path in the AROS binary tree as its source files had in the source tree. This can be changed by specifying the targetdir=... argument. The latter argument has to contain a full path, so most of the time it will start with $(AROSDIR)/, to put the program somewhere in the binary AROS tree.

So, to put the program in the Extras directory you use this:

%build_prog ... targetdir=$(AROSDIR)/Extras

As explained above the argument to a macro has to be enclosed in quotation marks if it contains more then one file. Currently the list can't be split over more then one line and often make variables are used to pass the list of files to build. The next three examples do the same only with different syntax. First: the in-line list version:

%build_prog \
    mmake=myprog progname=MyProg \
    files="file1 file2 file3"

Second: Using a make variable:

FILES := file1 file2 file3

%build_prog \
    mmake=myprog progname=MyProg \
    files=$(FILES)

Third: Using the make line continuation:

FILES := \
    file1 \
    file2 \
    file3

%build_prog \
    mmake=myprog progname=MyProg \
    files=$(FILES)

Build system reference

Varování

This reference manual is out of date and things have changed considerably. Please consult config/make.tmpl in the source code tree to see the current implementation. If you want to help updating this section, please contact us.

MetaMake

Introduction

MetaMake is a version of make which allows to recursively build targets in the various directories of a project or even another project. It searches a directory tree for makefiles and all makefiles it finds for "metatargets". Then it tries to build all metatargets. You can also specify a program which converts "source" makefiles into makefiles before MetaMake will invoke make.

Syntax of the makefile

MetaMake uses normal makefile syntax but gives a special meaning to a comment line that starts with #MM. This line is used to define so called metatargets. The name of the makefile itself is defined in the MetaMake config file that is discussed in one of the following sections.

There exist three ways of defining a metatarget in a makefile:

  • This defines a metatarget with its meta-prerequisites:

    #MM metatarget : meta-prerequisites
    

    When a user asks to build this metatarget, first the meta-prerequisites will be build as metatargets and afterwards the given metatarget.

    This form also indicates that in this makefile also a makefile target is present with the same name. This makefile target has to be defined, yet.

  • This is the same definition as in the previous paragraph, but now no normal make target is present in the makefile with the same name as the metatarget. Using this 'virtual' metatargets speeds up the build because make isn't called with this target:

    #MM- metatarget : meta-prerequisites
    
  • This form defines both a metatarget and a make target with the same name. The prerequisites are no meta-prerequisites:

    #MM
    metatarget : prerequisites
    

The line for the definition of a metatarget can be spread over several lines if you end every line with the \ character and start the next line with #MM.

You can define a metatarget with the same name in several files. The meta-prerequisites are then gathered as if they were in a single entry.

If a metatarget is defined both with #MM and #MM- the #MM has priority.

How MetaMake works

MetaMake is run by calling make in the root directory of the AROS source tree.

At first MetaMake will build up a tree of all the makefiles present in a root directory and all subdirectories. At the same time it will also build a tree of all the metatargets and their dependencies.

Next it will build all the meta-prerequisites needed for this metatarget and then finally the metatarget itself. Or viewed differently: every meta-prerequisite is handled as a metatarget when it needs to be build. For each of these metatargets a walk through of all the directories is done. In every makefile where the metatarget is defined by the first or third way from the previous section make is called with the name of the target as a make target.

When MetaMake calls normal make also two variables are defined. $(TOP) has the value of the root directory and $(CURDIR) the path relative to this root directory.

Metatargets which aren't a prerequisite of another target aren't build by default. If you want to build such a metatarget you have to type make metatarget in the root directory of the AROS source tree.

Auto-generated makefiles

Another feature of MetaMake is automatic generating a makefile from a source makefile. When the directory tree is scanned for all the makefiles in every directory it is checked if a makefile is present with a .src suffix added. If it is there and is newer than the makefile present in that directory a script will be called to regenerate the makefile from the source makefile. What script has to be called is defined in the configuration file.

Examples

The next few examples are taken from the AROS project.

Example 1: Normal dependencies

#MM contrib-regina-module : setup linklibs includes contrib-regina-includes

This example says that in this makefile a contrib-regina-module is exists that has to be built. Before building this metatarget first the metatargets setup, linklibs, ... have to be built; this ensures that the includes, linklibs etc. will be present before this module will be built.

Example 2: Metatarget consisting of submetatargets

#MM- contrib-freetype : contrib-freetype-linklib \
#MM      contrib-freetype-graph \
#MM      contrib-freetype-fonts \
#MM      contrib-freetype-demos

Here, it actually says that the contrib-freetype metatarget requires the building of linklib, graph, fonts and demos of freetype. If some extra work needs to be done in the makefile where this metatarget is, the definition can start with #MM and then a normal make target contrib-freetype should be present in the makefile.

Also, the use of the line continuation for the metatarget definition is demonstrated here.

Example 3: Quick building of a target

#MM workbench-utilities : includes linklibs setup-clock-catalogs
#MM
workbench-utilities-quick : workbench-utilities

Normally, when a user executes MetaMake with as its argument workbench-utilities, make will be called in every the directories where the meta-prerequisites are included in the makefile. This can become quite annoying when debugging programs. If the second metatarget workbench-utilities-quick is defined as shown above, only that target will be build in this directory. Of course, the user has then to be sure that the metatargets on which workbench-utilities depend are up-to-date.

Configuration file

The MetaMake configuration file should have the path $(TOP)/mmake.config. A short explanation of its content:

[AROS]
Begins a config section for the project AROS.
maketool $(HOST_MAKE) $(MKARGS) TOP=$(TOP) CURDIR=$(CURDIR) TARGET=$(TARGET)
Specifies the name of the tool to build a target. This is usually make.
defaultmakefilename mmakefile
This defines mmakefile as name for MetaMake makefiles.
genmakefilescript $(GENMF) $(TOP)/config/make.tmpl --listfile $(MMLIST)
MetaMake allows to generate makefiles with a script. The makefile will be regenerated if it doesn't exist, if the source file is newer or if the file specified with genmakefiledeps is newer. The name of the source file is generated by concatenating defaultmakefilename and ".src"
genmakefiledeps $(GENMF) $(TOP)/config/make.tmpl
If this file is newer than the makefile, the given script will be executed.
globalvarfile $(TOP)/bin/$(AROS_HOST_ARCH)-$(AROS_HOST_CPU)/gen/config/host.cfg
MetaMake will read this file and every variable in this file will be available everywhere where you can use a variable.
genglobalvarfile sh $(TOP)/configure
This defines a script to regenerate the globalvarfile.
ignoredir ...
This tells MetaMake to ignore these directories.

Genmf

Introduction

Genmf uses two files for generating a makefile. The first one is the macro definition file and the second the source makefile (mmakefile.src) where these macros can be used. The macros for AROS are in the file $(TOP)/config/make.tmpl.

Syntax

In general the % character is used as the special character for genmf source makefiles.

Macro definition

A macro definition has the following syntax:

%define macroname option1[=[default][\A][\M]] option2[=[default][\A][\M]] ...
...
%end

macroname is the name of the macro. option1, option2, ... are the arguments for the macro. These options can be used in the body of this template by typing %(option1). This will be replaced be the value of option1.

The argument can be followed by a default value. If no default value is specified an empty string is taken. Normally no spaces are allowed in the default value of an argument. If this is needed this can be done by surrounding the value with double quotes (").

Also two switches can be added:

\A
Is the switch to always require a value for this. When the macro is instantiated, it always needs a value to be assigned to this argument.
\M
Is the switch to turn on multi-words. This also means that this has to be the final argument, as any argument specified after this would be swallowed by the multi-word.

Macro instantiation

The instantiation of the macro is done by using the '%' character followed by the name of the macro to instantiate (without round brackets around it):

%macro_name [option1=]value [option2=]value

Two ways are possible to specify value for arguments to a macro:

value
This will assign the first value to the first argument, the second value to the second argument, and so on.
option1=value
This will assign the given value to the option with the specified name.

When giving values to arguments, again double quotes are required to include spaces in the values of the arguments.

Macro instantiation may be used inside the body of a macro, even macros that will only be defined later on in the macro definition file.

Poznámka

In the definition of the genmf rules sometimes MetaMake variables are used as default variables for an argument (e.g. dflags=%(cflags)). This is not really possible in the definition file but is done by using text that has the same effect.

AROS application development macros reference

High level mmakefile.src macros

AROS standard MetaMake targets

The following metatargets are often used as prerequisite:

  • includes: the *.h files
  • linklibs: static linker libraries

FIXME: complete

Poznámka

These mega MetaMake targets were introduced in the beginning of the project. The usage of these metatargets is now considered as deprecated and should be avoided.

One should try to use more specific targets for dependencies, e.g. if a certain program uses a certain library one should specify this library as a dependency of this program not all the linklibs by using the linklibs metatarget.

Building programs

There are two macros for building programs. One macro %build_progs that will compile every input file to a separate executable and one macro %build_prog that will compile and link all the input files into one executable.

Macro %build_progs

This macro will compile and link every input file into a separate executable and has the following definition:

%define build_progs mmake=/A files=/A \
    objdir=$(GENDIR)/$(CURDIR) targetdir=$(AROSDIR)/$(CURDIR) \
    cflags=$(CFLAGS) dflags=$(BD_CFLAGS$(BDID)) ldflags=$(LDFLAGS) \
    uselibs= usehostlibs= usestartup=yes detach=no

With the following arguments:

mmake=/A
This is the name of the metatarget that will build the programs. Also a %(mmake)-quick metatarget will be defined.
files=/A
The base-names of the C source files that will be compiled and linked to executables. For every name present in this list an executable with the same name will be generated.
objdir=$(GENDIR)/$(CURDIR)
The directory where the compiled object files will be put.
targetdir=$(AROSDIR)/$(CURDIR)
The directory where the executables will be placed.
cflags=$(CFLAGS)
The flags to add when compiling the .c files. By default the standard AROS cflags (the $(CFLAGS) make variables are taken. This also means that some flags can be added by assigning these to the USER_CFLAGS and USER_INCLUDES make variables before using this macro.
dflags=%(cflags)
The flags to add when doing the dependency check. Default is the same as the cflags.
ldflags=$(LDFLAGS)
The flags to use when linking the executables. By default the standard AROS link flags will be used.
uselibs=

A list of static libraries to add when linking the executables. This is the name of the library without the lib prefix or the .a suffix and without the -l prefix for the use in the flags for the C compiler.

By default no libraries are used when linking the executables.

usehostlibs=

A list of static libraries of the host to add when linking the executables. This is the name of the library without the lib prefix or the .a suffix and without the -l prefix for the use in the flags for the C compiler.

By default no libraries are used when linking the executables.

usestartup=yes
Use the standard start-up code for the executables. By default this is yes and this is also what someone wants most of the time. Only disable this if you know what you are doing.
detach=no
Whether the executables will run detached. Defaults to no.

Macro %build_prog

This macro will compile and link the input files into an single executable and has the following definition:

%define build_prog mmake=/A progname=/A files=%(progname) asmfiles= \
    objdir=$(GENDIR)/$(CURDIR) targetdir=$(AROSDIR)/$(CURDIR) \
    cflags=$(CFLAGS) dflags=$(BD_CFLAGS$(BDID)) ldflags=$(LDFLAGS) \
    aflags=$(AFLAFS) uselibs= usehostlibs= usestartup=yes detach=no

With the following arguments:

mmake=/A
This is the name of the metatarget that will build the program. Also a %(mmake)-quick metatarget will be defined.
progname=/A
The name of the executable.
files=
The base-names of the C source files that will be compiled and linked into the executable. By default just the name of the executable is taken.
asmfiles=
The assembler files to assemble and include in the executable. By default no asm files are included in the executable.
objdir=$(GENDIR)/$(CURDIR)
The directory where the compiled object files will be put.
targetdir=$(AROSDIR)/$(CURDIR)
The directory where the executables will be placed.
cflags=$(CFLAGS)
The flags to add when compiling the .c files. By default the standard AROS cflags (the $(CFLAGS) make variable) are taken. This also means that some flags can be added by assigning these to the USER_CFLAGS and USER_INCLUDES make variables before using this macro.
dflags=%(cflags)
The flags to add when doing the dependency check. Default is the same as the cflags.
aflags=$(AFLAGS)
The flags to add when compiling the asm files. By default the standard AROS aflags (e.g. $(AFLAGS)) are taken. This also means that some flags can be added by assigning these to the SPECIAL_AFLAGS make variable before using this macro.
ldflags=$(LDFLAGS)
The flags to use when linking the executable. By default the standard AROS link flags will be used.
uselibs=

A list of static libraries to add when linking the executable. This is the name of the library without the lib prefix or the .a suffix and without the -l prefix for the use in the flags for the C compiler.

By default no libraries are used when linking the executable.

usehostlibs=

A list of static libraries of the host to add when linking the executable. This is the name of the library without the lib prefix or the .a suffix and without the -l prefix for the use in the flags for the C compiler.

By default no libraries are used when linking the executable.

usestartup=yes
Use the standard start-up code for the executables. By default this is yes and this is also what someone wants most of the time. Only disable this if you know what you are doing.
detach=no
Whether the executable will run detached. Defaults to no.

Common

%define common

This adds some common stuff to the makefile, like a clean target. The clean target only deletes generated makefiles.

Building catalogs

The definition of the macro is as follows:

%define build_catalogs mmake=/A name=/A subdir=/A \
  catalogs="$(basename $(wildcard *.ct))" source="../strings.h" \
  description="$(basename $(wildcard *.cd))" dir=$(AROS_CATALOGS) \
  sourcedescription="$(TOOLDIR)/C_h_orig"

With the meaning of the arguments as follows:

mmake=/A
This is the name of the metatarget that will build the catalogs. Also a %(mmake)-clean metatarget will be defined.
name=/A
This is the name of the destination catalog, without the .catalog suffix.
subdir=A
This is the destination subdir of the catalogs.
catalogs
This is the list of catalogs, without the .ct suffix (default *.ct)
source
This is the path to the generated source code file. The default value creates the file strings.h in the parent directory. Remember that generated files must not be committed to SVN.
description
This is the catalog description file (.cd) (default *.cd).
dir
This is the base destination directory (default $(AROS_CATALOGS)).
sourcedescription
This is the path to the FlexCat's source description file, without the .sd suffix.

Example:

%build_catalogs mmake=workbench-system-wanderer-tools-info-catalogs \
name=Info subdir=System/System/Wanderer/Tools

Building icons

Creates icons. The images must be in PNG or ILBM format. The icon is configured from an additional text file with the name %(iconname).info.src. You can find the documentation of this file in $(TOP)/tools/ilbmtoicon/README

The definition of the macro is as follows:

%define build_icons mmake=/A icons=/A dir=/A

With the meaning of the arguments as follows:

mmake
This is the name of the metatarget. Also a %(mmake)-clean metatarget will be defined.
icons
This is a list of icon base names (without the .info suffix).
dir
This is the destination directory.

Example:

%build_icons mmake=workbench-system-wanderer-tools-newdrawer-icons \
icons=newdrawer dir=$(AROS_WANDERER)/Tools

The definition file has the name newdrawer.info.src.

Building static link-libraries

Building link-libraries is straight-forward. A list of files will be compiled or assembled and collected into a link library in a specified target directory.

The definition of the macro is as follows:

%define build_linklib mmake=/A libname=/A files="$(basename $(wildcard *.c)) \
  asmfiles= objs= cflags=$(CFLAGS) dflags=%(cflags) aflags=$(AFLAGS) \
  objdir=$(OBJDIR) libdir=$(LIBDIR)

With the meaning of the arguments as follows:

mmake=/A
This is the name of the metatarget that will build the linklib.
libname=/A
The base name of the library to generate. The file that will be generated will be called lib%(libname).a
files=$(basename $(wildcard *.c))
The C files to compile and include in the library. By default all the files ending in .c in the source directory will be used.
asmfiles=
The assembler files to assemble and include in the library. By default no asm files are included in the library.
objs=
Additional objects to link into the linklib. The objects have to be given with full absolute path and the .o suffix.
cflags=$(CFLAGS)
The flags to use when compiling the .c files. By default the standard AROS cflags (e.g. $(CFLAGS)) are taken. This also means that some flags can be added by assigning these to the USER_CFLAGS and USER_INCLUDES make variables before using this macro.
dflags=%(cflags)
The flags to add when doing the dependency check. Default is the same as the cflags.
aflags=$(AFLAGS)
The flags to add when compiling the asm files. By default the standard AROS aflags (e.g. $(AFLAGS)) are taken. This also means that some flags can be added by assigning these to the SPECIAL_AFLAGS make variable before using this macro.
objdir=$(OBJDIR)
The directory where to generate all the intermediate files. The default value is $(OBJDIR) which in itself is by default equal to $(GENDIR)/$(CURDIR).
libdir=$(LIBDIR)
The directory to put the library in. By default the standard library directory $(LIBDIR) will be used.

Compiling arch- and/or CPU-specific files

In the previous paragraph the method was explained how a module can be built with the AROS genmf macros. Sometimes someone wants to replace certain files in a module with an implementation only valid for a certain arch or a certain CPU.

The macro definition

Arch-specific files are handled by the macro called %build_archspecific and it has the following header:

%define build_archspecific mainmmake=/A maindir=/A arch=/A files= asmfiles= \
cflags=$(CFLAGS) dflags=%(cflags) aflags=$(AFLAGS) compiler=target

The explanation of the argument to this macro:

mainmmake=/A
The mmake of the module from which someone wants to replace files or to which to add additional files.
maindir=/A
The directory where the object files of the main module are stored. The is only the path relative to $(GENDIR). Most of the time this is the directory where the source files of the module are stored.
arch=/A
The architecture for which these files have to be build. It can have three different forms: ARCH-CPU, ARCH or CPU. For example, when linux-i386 is specified, these files will only be built for the linux port on i386. With ppc it will be build for all PowerPC processors and with linux it will be build for all Linux ports.
files=
The base-names of the C source files to replace or to add to the module.
asmfiles=
The base-names of the asm source files to replace or to add to the module.
cflags=$(CFLAGS)
The flags to add when compiling the .c files. By default the standard AROS cflags (the $(CFLAGS) make variables are taken. This also means that some flags can be added by assigning these to the USER_CFLAGS and USER_INCLUDES make variables before using this macro.
dflags=%(cflags)
The flags to add when doing the dependency check. Default is the same as the cflags.
aflags=$(AFLAGS)
The flags to add when assembling the asm files. By default the standard AROS cflags (the $(AFLAGS) make variable) are taken. This also means that some flags can be added by assigning these to the SPECIAL_AFLAGS make variable before using this macro.
compiler=target
Indicates which compiler to use when compiling C source files. Can be either target or host to use the target compiler or the host compiler. By default the target compiler is used.

Code shared by different ports

A second macro called %rule_archalias allows to create a virtual architecture. Any code for that virtual architecture can be shared between several other architectures. Most likely this is used for code that uses an API that is shared between several architecture but not all of them.

The macro has the following header:

%define rule_archalias mainmmake=/A arch=/A alias=/A

With the following arguments

mainmmake=/A
The mmake of the module from which someone wants to replace files or to which to add additional files.
arch=/A
The arch someone wants to make alias from.
alias=/A
The arch someone wants to alias to.

Examples

  1. This is an extract from the file config/linux/exec/mmakefile.src that replaces the main init.c file from exec with a linux specialized one:

    %build_archspecific \
      mainmmake=kernel-exec maindir=rom/exec arch=linux \
      files=init compiler=host
    
  2. For the dos.library some arch-specific files are grouped together in the Unix arch. The following lines are present in the several mmakefiles to make this possible

    In config/linux/mmakefile.src:

    %rule_archalias mainmmake=kernel-dos arch=linux alias=unix
    

    In config/freebsd/mmakefile.src:

    %rule_archalias mainmmake=kernel-dos arch=freebsd alias=unix
    

    And finally in config/unix/dos/mmakefile.src:

    %build_archspecific \
      mainmmake=kernel-dos maindir=rom/dos \
      arch=unix \
      files=boot \
      compiler=host
    

The file $(TOP)/config/make.tmpl contains more macros. See the comments in that file for their usage.

AROS portable makefile variables

The file $(TOP)/config/make.cfg is usually included in all makefiles. It contains a lot of variables which are often used in these makefiles. The most important are the absolute paths for standard directories (e.g. AROS_C) and names for tools (e.g. MMAKE, GENMF).

Platform-dependent definitions can be found in:

  • $(TOP)/bin/$(AROS_HOST_ARCH)-$(AROS_HOST_CPU)/gen/config/host.cfg
  • $(TOP)/bin/$(AROS_HOST_ARCH)-$(AROS_HOST_CPU)/gen/config/target.cfg

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